Fellow Therapists: Embodied Collaborative Psychotherapy (ECP) is here!

 

Do you have a client who is stuck in their therapy process?

Do you have a client who struggles to stay embodied enough to communicate verbally while triggered?

Which of your clients would benefit from therapeutic touch as a support to their talk therapy?

 

“Deep healing on your own terms… with the extra juice that comes from being witnessed by not only one healing professional, but two! Powerful!”
(JL – Denver, CO)

 

Denver ECP Intensive

April 14-16, 2017

 

The Embodied Collaborative Psychotherapy (ECP) Intensive uses a two-practitioner model to deepen and ignite the healing process through simultaneous psychotherapy and bodywork.  ECP is a short-term, supplemental approach designed to work in support of ongoing/previous talk therapy. The Intensive is complementary to the therapeutic relationship already in place and is not a replacement for the important attachment established between client and therapist.
ECP is appropriate for clients who are well-resourced, who are or previously were in long-term therapy, and are prepared to dig deep to emerge from inertia and regain a healing momentum.
Professional bodywork practitioners and mental health care providers are also welcome as clients in the ECP Intensive. For more information and to find out if you or your clients are eligible for participation in the upcoming Denver Intensive, contact us today at:

 

Matthew LeBauer, LCSW

Heather Lenox, HTCP

info@lebauercounseling.com

720-468-0676

Embodied Collaborative Psychotherapy (ECP)- April Intensive

Do you get flustered when trying to talk about your feelings?

Do you feel stuck in your healing process?

Are you ready to regain momentum?
 

“Deep healing on your own terms… with the extra juice that comes from being witnessed by not only one healing professional, but two! Powerful!”
(JL – Denver, CO)

 

Denver ECP Intensive

April 14-16, 2017

 

Embodied Collaborative Psychotherapy (ECP) uses a two-practitioner model to deepen and ignite your healing process through simultaneous psychotherapy and bodywork. This collaborative therapeutic structure increases your sense of being seen, supported and therapeutically challenged. In collaboration with you, we will activate your mind-body connection supporting you to overcome inertia and get past your roadblocks.
ECP is appropriate for clients who are currently or were previously in long-term therapy and also for professional bodywork practitioners and mental healthcare providers. For more information and to find out if you are eligible for participation in the upcoming Denver Intensive, contact us today at:

 

Matthew LeBauer, LCSW

Heather Lenox, HTCP

info@lebauercounseling.com

720-468-0676

Connection & Belonging Soothe Isolation & Rejection

From the Times of Israel a powerful blog post on the importance of community to bring a sense of connection and belonging to families adjusting to an out LGBTQ child in the midst of a community that has historically not been as welcoming as many would hope. When we experience a sense of belonging we gain resilience to isolation and rejection.

“I calmed her as best I could, and tried to push away the questions, fears and thoughts swirling through my own head. Initially I kept her news from my husband, as she had requested, and cast about for someone I could turn to for advice. In 1998, I knew that Orthodox parents of gay children were marginalized. I didn’t want that to happen to my daughter and our family. Who could I talk to?”

“Carrying this secret can lead to feelings of loss of community and a sense of chaos. We experience bouts of endless questioning, worries and tears. But on the outside we remain silent — as do our communities. Three out of four parents of LGBT children told Eshel that their rabbis, day school administrators and other communal leaders do not speak about “it.””

“For our children the rejection is all too real. The Eshel parent survey reveals that 60 percent of our children have left the Orthodox community or no longer attend any shul. For traditional parents, synagogue and community rejection can be the most painful part of the coming-out process. When the community no longer makes space for your child, ­what is there to belong to and why?”

Click for links to Eshel and their upcoming Retreat for Orthodox Jewish Parents of LGBTQ youth.

Resource: Support Makes Separation & Divorce Less Adversarial

I encourage people in relationships to find a relationship counselor long before it’s needed. For those in relationships who don’t, it’s sometimes too late to save the relationship. At the same time, counseling can be the perfect resource to end a relationship smoothly and amicably. As much as I help clients improve their relationships, I also help people move through the process of ending it compassionately.

For those who need legal processes to resolve their relationships, I commonly hear from clients worried about the adversarial nature of our court system. They worry that the system will make an already overwhelming process of separation and divorce even more confrontational.

The Center for Out of Court Divorce is a ‘new’ community resource to help those couples who would rather pursue their legal separation and the reconfiguring of their family structure and interactions amicably. (I put ‘new’ in quotes because the Center is actually a renamed entity after a pilot period at DU, now operating as an independent non-profit.)

“The Center for Out-Of-Court Divorce provides a proven family-centered approach for couples with children who want to end their partnership or marriage through compassionate, holistic divorce resolution. This out-of-court process works in partnership with the legal system to offer financial and legal education, mediation and individual and family counseling. We empower parents by helping them avoid a court process that is often lengthy, expensive and conflicted in order to support the long-term well-being of families.”

To learn more, you can hear an interview about the Center from Colorado Public Radio’s Colorado Matters here.

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Build Shock Absorbers For a Stable Foundation

Skyscrapers and highways use shock absorbers to protect their integrity and stability when the earth trembles beneath them. My work with clients serves the same purpose. I help people install shock absorbers so their emotional experiences do not rattle or undermine their emotional foundation. When a client uses these shock absorbers, things can go wrong – they may experience uncertainty, fear or sadness – and they still feel confident and stable moving forward.